Occupy Movement in Minneapolis… Is Over.

The Occupy Movement officially ended the moment it began thanks to outliers in the primary groups, differing opinions, and lack there of of any basic progressive ideas; this was extremely evident today, May 1st.

It was like a barren desert except for all the donated food, a few signs, and some long faced participants awaiting the calvary.  They kept waiting and no one showed… 

I would say the Occupy Movement, as the Tea Party movement, has been on a downward spiral ever since it became a topic, or ever since any moderately intelligent person involved realized that they may be just as crazy as the inverse opposite group; you know, both lacking anything progressive, because nothing new is said or promoted (besides knowing where we/they/us/you stand), and basically surrendering to the 1% and giving up.  Writing out the problem and not solving it doesn’t produce any answer of consequence or importance, as does pointing out the problem and not figuring a way to change it.

By utilizing resources i.e. labor, government programs, and or education to benefit your situation.

The movement looked dismal, deserted, and in despair from afar, in my lofty apartment where I live in a condo, from which I bike to work to wash dishes and write.  I found out actually how depressing it was after I walked across the street to Loring Park (where the occupation was being held).  The signs thrown up around town for this event far surpassed the amount of attendees.  I took note of the posters probably a month before.  I like to locate these events because of the abundance of rebellious attitudes, the high chance of seeing someone beaten and arrested by over zealous policemen, and the copious amounts of free-spirited adults.  Like any guy there I know a good time when I see one…

They had many sandwiches, some apples, and few smiles.  But by God they were there, and they had their convictions.  

I am a non-denominational liberal free-spirit.

Not to strictly disparage the first Occupy Movement, I went to in the Government Plaza downtown was awe inspiring.  I stayed all day.  I took account of the people.  The crazy fashion, the signs, the spirit, and I noticed a few things.

I noticed not much besides a few ideas about we are poor and they are rich, and we work hard and they don’t, that there was really not message that stuck out.  There was no fix.  I felt like people just wanted to get together and be into something.  Like some of the old-timers or some of the youngin’s had missed their mark, or needed to hold their own.  This was personal, we are all poor.  I thought about this and I felt bad.  I knew it was over.  I knew from that moment it was gone.

We were impotent, standing on the side, distracted holding signs.  

I was leaving the rally that night after hours of random people passing the megaphone around saying next to nothing of relevance, completely incongruent with what the person before them had said, and people were still asking me to stay.  Stay for the cause.  I left the cause after a drunk homeless man grabbed center stage and ran with it.  People in the crowd slurring drunken remarks as if it were words passed down from God, or whomever they worshiped.  I felt I grasped the point at this moment.  I did not stay.

I took photos before I left, I stood smiling.  I went home to a beer, a warm house, and my roommates.  My roommates have jobs, as I did at the time, and still do, and they wanted to be there.  They wanted to express themselves, but they had to go to work and pay bills.  I called in sick and took one for the team.  Being outside was my protest, taking in the sights and sounds helped.

But what I didn’t get was why people were so into something that had nothing real to accomplish.  I mean we could kill all the rich people and take their money, but then we would be rich and we would become what we hated so much…  Sad story.

And then I realized that that was the purpose, because so many had stuck to a plan, any plan, but not to a plan long enough to see it through to fruition.  If that was the case then the perfect plan would be one with no solution, no real fix.  Enter the Occupy Movement.

***

Did I just say that?  Did I just give it all away.  Tea Party and all.

If there was nothing to do but conform, yet there was nothing to conform to because the outliers and the mean were so mixed up that you didn’t know which was which, but you needed to feel like you did something, what would you do?

Answer the fucking question:  Tea Party or the Occupy Movement?

***

People could go on Occupying, protesting, and feeling moderately important.  Like CNN blew us up with a spot just before the latest election news.  We are famous, as successful as the rest of the Occupiers, and we are getting something done.  We are getting our fat fucking faces on t.v., cause we all know we are getting free food (or at least where to get it), so we are doing better than most.  There are drinking fountains and fat people everywhere, so we are not walking very far for water, and we still go home to see how popular we are on the internet, a social group, or on the television, in a movement.

In conclusion, because of the low number of participants with actual plans that correlate to fixing the problem for anyone (other than feeding some people sandwiches) the Occupy Movement is over.

There are a few too many Dudes from The Big Lebowski, and I never thought I would think that was a bad thing.

Also, like Jay-z said, “put me any where on God’s green earth and I’ll triple my worth”, are we not as resourceful as Jay-z?

Has America lost it?

What I actually saw at the Loring Park Occupation:

Horse poop, more cops than occupiers.

Can’t relate old vs. young.

What should really be promoted at the Occupy Movement:

All my friends have good jobs, I have something to look forward to if I get my shit together.

I have beer and food in the fridge.

I have cable and access to the internet.

I have no working car, sort of a job, and more organic fridge matter in my apt. and ladies than most rich dudes ever do.

We are living well if we try, making the best of it.

About Terry Scott Niebeling

Hello, My name is Terry Scott Niebeling. I am a writer, biker, thinker, performance artist, actor, college student living in Minneapolis. I love being outside, but most of the year I am a shut-in, doing and such. I frequent the beach, restaurants, and the library. I enjoy spending time with my friends and family. I love moving, biking, and having a conversation with friends. I also enjoy long walks on the beach and puppies. I invite conversation and critique. I compose/share creative non-fiction, fiction, poetry, language, and prose for multiple blogs and publications. I work at a Library... If you care to contribute to a local writer/artist and enjoy reading on your smart device, check out my ebook on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BO67H96
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